LMPD looking to get back to ‘basic marketing’ to fill police officer vacancies

As the violence surges in the metro, LMPD is desperate for more officers on the streets. The department is short more than 240 officers.Becoming a police officer was Detective Jay Moss’s dream.”You have to be wired a certain way, built a certain way to endure this job as long as I have,” said Detective Jay Moss. “Even after 21 years, people ask why I am still here? I’m here for the people.”He’s hoping the department can attract more people who also want to be a part of the team. Currently, there are more than 240 vacant positions, many officers are retiring while others are transferring to other departments.Now, LMPD is doing more to attract new recruits.”Going back to marketing on the radio, going back to TV, those used to be our staples. When I first got here, you used to see a billboard on 265 and 65,” Moss said.Moss says the department has been working to join forces with community organizations to answer questions for those who may be hesitant to become an officer.Currently, LMPD has two recruiting classes. One class has 30 recruits, while the other only has 18. Out of that 18 person class, 13 are from Louisville.”The only way we’re going to make a change is if I get people who live here to come work here because if I get them from the community and get them to go out, they know what to expect because they grew up in that community,” Moss told WLKY.And of the 13 Louisville recruits, three grew up in West Louisville. While that number itself doesn’t seem high, Moss says you’ll be surprised what kind of difference it can make.”I don’t mean this in any kind of way, but the more folks that look like me to come work here, the more comfortable they’ll be in the West End,” Moss told WLKY.While there’s no timetable on when those vacancies will be filled, Moss says the new hires will be officers who are passionate about making a difference.”We have to put our seatbelts on and understand this is not a quick fix. We would love for it to be, but then again would you want me to give somebody a badge and a gun after two weeks of training,” he said.Click this link for more information.

As the violence surges in the metro, LMPD is desperate for more officers on the streets. The department is short more than 240 officers.

Becoming a police officer was Detective Jay Moss’s dream.

“You have to be wired a certain way, built a certain way to endure this job as long as I have,” said Detective Jay Moss. “Even after 21 years, people ask why I am still here? I’m here for the people.”

He’s hoping the department can attract more people who also want to be a part of the team. Currently, there are more than 240 vacant positions, many officers are retiring while others are transferring to other departments.

Now, LMPD is doing more to attract new recruits.

“Going back to marketing on the radio, going back to TV, those used to be our staples. When I first got here, you used to see a billboard on 265 and 65,” Moss said.

Moss says the department has been working to join forces with community organizations to answer questions for those who may be hesitant to become an officer.

Currently, LMPD has two recruiting classes. One class has 30 recruits, while the other only has 18. Out of that 18 person class, 13 are from Louisville.

“The only way we’re going to make a change is if I get people who live here to come work here because if I get them from the community and get them to go out, they know what to expect because they grew up in that community,” Moss told WLKY.

And of the 13 Louisville recruits, three grew up in West Louisville. While that number itself doesn’t seem high, Moss says you’ll be surprised what kind of difference it can make.

“I don’t mean this in any kind of way, but the more folks that look like me to come work here, the more comfortable they’ll be in the West End,” Moss told WLKY.

While there’s no timetable on when those vacancies will be filled, Moss says the new hires will be officers who are passionate about making a difference.

“We have to put our seatbelts on and understand this is not a quick fix. We would love for it to be, but then again would you want me to give somebody a badge and a gun after two weeks of training,” he said.

Click this link for more information.

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